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Police Officer Moira Ann Smith Playground

On the anniversary of September 11th, many members of the Flatiron community remember fallen neighborhood Police Officer Moira Ann Smith. The playground in Madison Square Park was renamed “Police Officer Moira Ann Smith Playground” on March 10, 2012, in honor of Moira Ann Smith who lost her life that day. As a member of the NYPD 13th Precinct, Officer Smith proudly served Madison Square Park and the surrounding Flatiron District.

Officer Smith is credited with being the first police officer to report seeing the attacks calling the Communications Division so it could notify others (via Investor's Business Daily). Next, she reportedly took witnesses to the 13th Precinct for statements. After dropping the witnesses off for interviewing, Smith joined several police officers on their way to the World Trade Center. At the site, Officer Smith evacuated hundreds of people out of the towers as she continually returned to the building after exiting to save as many lives as possible.

Officer Smith kept people moving out of the buildings while trying to prevent mass hysteria. Her coolness under pressure was remembered by a survivor, Martin Glynn: “The mass of people exiting the building felt the calm assurance that they were being directed by someone in authority who was in control of the situation. Her actions even seemed ordinary, even commonplace. She insulated the evacuees from the awareness of the dangerous situation they were in, with the result that everything preceded smoothly” (via Law Officer). Reportedly, Smith learned of a woman who was having an asthma attack, so she reentered the building to assist just before the south tower collapsed.

Officer Smith was the New York Police Department’s only fallen female officer that day. This playground renamed in her honor pays tribute to her selfless sacrifice. Officer Smith loved walking through Madison Square Park as a community police officer. Officer Smith was posthumously awarded NYPD's Medal of Honor three months after her death. Her shield and '13’ collar brass indicating her assignment to the 13th Precinct are preserved in the 9/11 Museum in New York City.

 

Sources: Law OfficerInvestor's Business Daily, CBS Local News